Paper Thin Speakers and Microphones

Paper Thin SpeakersMichigan State University Research

In an amazing research development, scientists at the Michigan State University, have created a transducer that is paper thin.

From the Michigan State University website posted by Andy Henlon, MSU associate professor Nelson Sepulveda states:

“This is the first transducer that is ultrathin, flexible, scalable and bidirectional, meaning it can convert mechanical energy to electrical energy and electrical energy to mechanical energy.”

This team created the FENG, the Ferroelectret Nanogenerator, and this research extends that development so that the energy conversion can be bi-directional, thus increasing its functionality.

In a really impressive video, they show how they converted a Michigan State University green and white Spartan flag into a speaker.

Fascinating work. A great way to show your students some cutting edge research that has huge societal implications.

Questions for Discussions

  1. What is FENG?
  2. Describe the difference between mechanical energy and electrical energy.
  3. What was the process by which they created the device?
  4. How are the ions added to each layer?
  5. What uses can your class brainstorm for this technology?
  6. Are there any negative implications they can imagine?

 

Benefits of Peer Support in Learning from Michigan State University

Benefits

As an educator, I find this new study from Michigan State University a bit troubling. Quite simply, peer feedback was more beneficial than teacher feedback in an online psychology course.

The research study, co-authored by Michigan State University associate professor of education, Carey Roseth, published recently in the International Journal of Educational Research, found that when students were given feedback to the question, “Why do I have to learn this” from a peer (a confederate posing as a peer) the student averaged a 92 percent for the entire semester long course.

The students who received the feedback from the teacher earned an 86 percent for the course.

Quite surprisingly, the control group, those that did not receive any feedback, earned a 90 percent for the course-still better than those that earned feedback from a teacher.

Professor Roseth explains,”… As a student, I can identify with my peers and imagine myself using the course material in the same way they do. This gives the material meaning and a sense of purpose that goes beyond memorization. When I hear a peer’s story, it connects to the story I am telling myself about who I want to be in the future.”

Questions for Discussion

  1. How many students were in each of the groups? (Why is it important to know the sample size?)
  2. If there was only one course instructor, what other possible explanations for this outcome could there be?
  3. Do you predict the outcomes would be the same in a face to face course?
  4. What did the script say? Why is it important to know what the script was-how could the wording of the script impact the outcome? Would the response be different with a different script?
  5. These were all introductory education students-could that have an impact on the results?
  6. How else could you extend this research-replicate, different subjects different design?
  7. How could you use this information in your own classroom?

For more information, please read Andy Henion’s article on the Michigan State University website, MSU Today.

Victory for MSU- Science Gallery Lab Detroit

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This March has brought an exciting victory for  the Michigan State University Spartans, and no I am not going to make any mention of any sort of athletic events occurring during this time period! (Too late?)

Check out the Science Gallery Lab Detroit. Michigan State has created the first Science Gallery Lab in North America. It is being described as “part art gallery, part science lab, part theatre.”

According to Michigan State University associate provost, Jeff Grabill, “This research can be used to engage and catch young people at an important moment in their lives, and to shape their journey into school and careers.”

It is aimed at students 15-25 and will help provide hands-on, interdisciplinary, collaborative experiences that is focused on using their specialized training, skills, and mindset to solve challenging real world problems.

Exhibitions don’t start until Fall 2017, but if you want more info check out these resources. You can see what the other Science Gallery Labs in Dublin, London, Melbourne, Venice and Bengaluru have been up to.

For a link to a more detailed article check out, Kim Ward’s article. 

For a link to the Science Gallery Lab Detroit, please click here.

Questions for Discussion

  1. Why is specialization and collaboration important?
  2. What are some interdisciplinary teams you have been involved in?
  3. What made them work or not work well?
  4. How can you create truly effective collaborative learning in your classroom?
  5. What would be a great project for the Science Gallery Lab Detroit to tackle? Perhaps something specific to Detroit, Michigan, or the Great Lakes Region?
  6. Perhaps an interdisciplinary approach to blight and abandoned houses in the neighborhoods?
  7. Perhaps an interdisciplinary approach to taking the successes of downtown development to the neighborhoods?